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#1 [url]

Jan 19 10 12:03 AM

Everyone is broke.  All I know is that I will join the tax revolt if they try and raise taxes instead of working towards fiscal sanity.

Maybe the states and feds should come talk to those of us working towards sustainability...

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#10 [url]

Jan 23 10 1:18 AM

Back from the madland! Apologies for enlarging my already over-sized carbon footprint. But damn it's good to be back! Hoping I can sleep off my jetlag and make the evening Rain Tour/Pirate Party tomorrow.

The article Jay posted is a good example of reality forcing change out of necessity. What struck me was that this "loss in convenience" (students having to walk longer distances to school) was portrayed as a negative. (Yeah I know, we're running out of money, not a good thing.) My question is, what's wrong with the kids getting more exercise while cutting down on consumption of our dwindling resources? 'course, if/when the buses stop totally, we'll have to adjust again, localize our schools, etc.

But my thoughts wandered a bit and it made me think about one of our friends...last year he spent time on a remote island (I believe in Samoa) for a photo shoot. He ended up staying longer than he'd planned. Told us that the natives lived in conditions we would all call "abject poverty", but that they were some of the happiest, healthiest people he had ever met. Even though they had "nothing", they knew how to laugh and enjoy life. Said it had a profound affect on him, interesting statement from a worldly old codger pushing 70.

And it begs the question: when our materialistic world is reduced to the bare necessities, are we capable of increasing the over-all quality of our lives?








A superior man is modest in his speech, but exceeds in his actions - Confucius

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#11 [url]

Jan 23 10 1:53 AM

after a hard detox from excessive habits, yes. ;)

I'm nowhere near living simply, but having come from LA I am doing huge percentages better than when I was there, and overall my life here is so much simpler and better.
 I can see the road ahead and the possibility of true joy with much less. 

Puna rain makes me feel rich! soursopstudio.blogspot.com/

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#13 [url]

Jan 25 10 11:09 AM

Property taxes are outrageous in Illinois as it is. My stepfather pays over 12k/year on his home in the suburbs of Chicago. With so many folks unemployed now, it's as viable as squeezing water out of a rock. And they're going to double up on State taxes? Suppose folks can pay that with their unemployment checks, yeah makes perfect sense...

So glad we are out of Illinois, and that my kids are out of high school. My guess is that long-term, Hawaii won't fare much better that Illinois, and in fact I see a lot of parallels between the two States. (Institutionalized corruption in politics and in unions--surprise, surprise.) The saving grace living here is that because of the small community nature of our island, we can at least make meaningful contributions to our community. What happens if/when the Illinois government implodes? Is this our first case study of things to come?

A superior man is modest in his speech, but exceeds in his actions - Confucius

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#14 [url]

Jan 25 10 11:16 AM

I'm with you.

Fortunately our ace in the hole(kinda worthless ace, actually) is that Hawaii is just about 6 to 9 months behind the curve. While our course of events is inevitably set for us, it's going to be useful to observe what Illinois, California, Arizona, etc., all do to cope with their insolvency, as it will set a precedent for us here. It seems all but certain that a federal bailout as to the tune of a trillion bucks will be necessary to keep the states functioning. Of course that's got ramifications of its own.

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#15 [url]

Jan 26 10 6:37 PM


just a shout out that consumption is alive and compulsive in los angelos!  other than the numerous for lease signs where boutiques used to be people almost seem worse.

i  often remember i spoke with a model who only wears second hand clothes as she cares for the planet -only buys used items, begging the question why modeling?  as one is only hawking clothes to others to buy. no shame in that per se , imho but snowing it is another matter.
 
i am seeing  very thinly veiled combative behavior if i mention gardening and changing of my  priorities. anyway, the point is in an odd way i am comforted as people have such a tremendous stake is maintaining the belief that 2005 is coming back economically that they will do  almost anything to perpetuate the fantasy.  and that may buy time for concerned people, like on this forum any many others  to get a leg up.

the level in investment in the status quo may keep the ship steady as people disembark.

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#17 [url]

Jan 26 10 9:03 PM

I think this is worth a read:

http://www.punaweb.org/Forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=9988

Let me suggest it's damn hard to plan for the future if you're not willing to define what the future is likely to be. It's exactly this kind of thinking, taking enormous unsupportable assumptions for granted that has killed Chrysler(twice) killed GM, sunk hundreds of banks, put 1 in 4 homeowners underwater, created a giant lurking disaster in commercial real estate, put 48 of 50 states in a position of budgetary insolvency and destroyed the US economy. Really, I've got a view of where we're headed, and reasons why I think so. I expect to be right or wrong within a sensible envelope of error. I've been pretty good at that over the years. All in all it's really pretty practical and reasonable view but it doesn't expect much or any economic growth. There's a significant chance of crisis but we may well skate by on dumb luck: I'd expect a simple slow and continual contraction in economic activity. I've reasons to think that. I'm not too concerned whether others agree or disagree, as that's something that can be worked out between rational people if they're actually willing to discuss it. We'd all learn something from the activity. But it's impossible to even start that discussion as people are unwilling to even consider other than what they want so badly to believe. What we have endemic, is a fundamentalist quasi-religious assumption that in the complete absence of evidence(to the positive) and ignorance/denial of evidence of the negative that we're going some time soon right back to business as usual. It will be 2005 all again. That view isn't just wrong, it's pathologically insane.

By the way. . .

The term "insanity" has an interesting origin, and I don't remember enough greek to follow up on it in much detail. What the term comes from is socialized public works in the Golden Age of the Greek empire. They would hire the nutcases at state expense and send them to go with brooms sweep the oncoming tide off the beach once a day. Those who did so were called the "insane."


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#18 [url]

Jan 26 10 9:47 PM

aw punafish! 
 yes! i was  crazy shopping! but it was  at  the grocer as prices were so inexpensive! honest! no clothes! but  alas i might even audition to hawk a product so i will just have button it.. 
 but feel it is worthwhile to acknowledge the depths of denial and delusion about. as i feel it bigger than i certainly thought.  most people here are so in the know they may not realize how ahead they might indeed be.  




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#20 [url]

Jan 27 10 10:14 AM

Posted: January 27th, 2010 11:00 AM ET
Washington (CNN) – More than three-quarters of Americans said that the current economic conditions are the worst that they've ever lived through, according to a new national poll.
A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Wednesday, hours before President Obama delivers his first State of the Union address, indicated that 77 percent of the public feels that the rough economic times the country's currently facing are the worst in their lifetime, while 22 percent said they've lived through worse times.
According to the poll, the economy remains the number-one issue on the public's mind, and six in ten Americans said it is extremely important for the president and Congress to deal with the economy this year.


How???????

Bill

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